Environment

  • EU focus on blue economy targeting marine...

    The European Commission is calling for a new approach in developing a sustainable blue economy, telling all member states that they need to develop plans in 2021 addressing the maritime sector. The EC said that a sustainable blue economy is essential to achieving the objectives of the European Green Deal and ensuring a green and inclusive recovery from the pandemic. They are calling for developing offshore renewable energy, decarbonizing maritime transport, and greening ports, while the Commission said it will increase its efforts on pollution including possibly further tightening the restrictions on ship recycling and plastics entering the maritime environment.

     

  • Methanol advances as alternative bunker fuel with...

    Methanex Corporation subsidiary Waterfront Shipping carried out barge-to-ship bunkering of methanol in collaboration with the Port of Rotterdam, highlighting the ease with which bunkering could occur for methanol powered vessels.

     

  • NGOs call on EU to exclude Biofuel and LNG from...

    A coalition of NGOs led by Transport & Environment has called on the European Commission to "explicitly exclude" biofuels and natural gas from a new clean marine fuel initiative, advocating for investment in electricity-based fuels instead.

     

  • IOG enters carbon capture and storage research...

    Independent Oil and Gas (IOG), the UK-based company developing gas fields in the North Sea, said Friday it had signed a collaboration agreement with GeoNetZero CDT to explore carbon capture and storage opportunities.

     

  • Port of Corpus Christi plans Green Hydrogen...

    The Port of Corpus Christi, Teas is joining a growing list of ports around the globe seeking to become part of the emerging hydrogen infrastructure to support the maritime and other industries. The port plans to develop renewable energy infrastructure to support the production of green hydrogen and potentially to provide renewable power directly to the port and its customers.

     

  • Regulating CO2 by fleets is effective approach...

    As the shipping industry and regulators continue to debate the best approach to achieving decarbonization, the influential organization Danish Shipping is presenting a new way of looking at compliance. In a new report sent to the International Maritime Organization, the group that represents the Danish industry suggested looking at compliance by fleets as opposed by individual ships.

     

  • Rotterdam and German steel companies explore...

    Two of Germany’s leading steel manufacturers are joining with the Port of Rotterdam to jointly investigate developing an international supply chain for hydrogen passing through the port as a replacement for the coal currently used in their manufacturing operations. The companies recognize that vast imports of hydrogen would be required if Europe and Germany want to reduce CO2 emissions by replacing current fuel sources and become climate-neutral by 2050 while maintaining its strong industrial backbone. 

     

  • Wärtsilä to introduce engine plus emissions...

    The technology group Wärtsilä will introduce a combined engine plus selective catalytic reduction (SCR) packaged product aimed at complying with China’s Stage II marine engine emission standard that enters into force in July 2021. The standard will apply to inland waterway, coastal, river-sea, channel and fishing vessels operating in most rivers and around the country’s major harbour areas.

     

  • Large LNG-powered RoPax fast ferry enters service...

    One of only a few large, fast passenger ferries fueled by natural gas is due to enter service tomorrow sailing between Spain and the Balearic Islands. In addition to being an LNG-fueled vessel, Balearia’s new vessel, the Eleanor Roosevelt, expands the company’s capacity and becomes the longest fast ferry. It is also the first LNG-fueled fast ferry with reciprocating engines.

     

  • Decarbonising shipping: Could ammonia be the fuel...

    By Charles Haskell, Decarbonisation Programme Manager, Lloyd’s Register (LR)

     

    Today 80 per cent of ammonia produced is used exclusively for the fertiliser industry. However, as pressure is placed on the shipping sector to decarbonise and shift away from reliance on fossil fuels, ammonia is looking like an attractive alternative. If 30 per cent of shipping switched to ammonia as a fuel, then the current production would have to nearly double

Pages

EU focus on blue economy targeting marine pollution and ship recycling

The European Commission is calling for a new approach in developing a sustainable blue economy, telling all member states that they need to develop plans in 2021 addressing the maritime sector. The EC said that a sustainable blue economy is essential to achieving the objectives of the European Green Deal and ensuring a green and inclusive recovery from the pandemic. They are calling for developing offshore renewable energy, decarbonizing maritime transport, and greening ports, while the Commission said it will increase its efforts on pollution including possibly further tightening the restrictions on ship recycling and plastics entering the maritime environment.

 
English

Port of Corpus Christi plans Green Hydrogen production facility

The Port of Corpus Christi, Teas is joining a growing list of ports around the globe seeking to become part of the emerging hydrogen infrastructure to support the maritime and other industries. The port plans to develop renewable energy infrastructure to support the production of green hydrogen and potentially to provide renewable power directly to the port and its customers.

 
English

Regulating CO2 by fleets is effective approach says Danish Shipping

As the shipping industry and regulators continue to debate the best approach to achieving decarbonization, the influential organization Danish Shipping is presenting a new way of looking at compliance. In a new report sent to the International Maritime Organization, the group that represents the Danish industry suggested looking at compliance by fleets as opposed by individual ships.

 
English

Rotterdam and German steel companies explore Hydrogen infrastructure

Two of Germany’s leading steel manufacturers are joining with the Port of Rotterdam to jointly investigate developing an international supply chain for hydrogen passing through the port as a replacement for the coal currently used in their manufacturing operations. The companies recognize that vast imports of hydrogen would be required if Europe and Germany want to reduce CO2 emissions by replacing current fuel sources and become climate-neutral by 2050 while maintaining its strong industrial backbone. 

 
English

Pages

Top